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Summer left an interesting comment on a previous post:

A lot of people would rather believe the stereotype than actually get to know someone as an individual.

I've been contemplating this a lot and have a few reactions to it.

My first reaction: Yes! I actually hadn't had the opportunity to develop a 'stereotype' before being asked to teach at a homeschool conference in CA. I'd never run into homeschoolers before. My experience was awesome. I met kids who were genuinely excited about learning and were very attentive. Let me say this has been far different than my classroom experience...even at the college level.

My second reaction: It makes sense. The only times it seems like homeschoolers and regular schoolers would voluntarily mix would be at community activities. Since so many activities are tied with schools, it seems like this would make mixing difficult.

My third reaction: Unfortunately, many homeschoolers even believe stereotypes about other types of homeschoolers. I think there are a lot of people who homeschool "quietly". I met this family I thought was great, and didn't find out they homeschooled until I had known them for months. I never would have guessed it because the didn't fit "the stereotype".

Now prepare yourselves for the insanity, but I think it would be cool to start a "homeschool mixer" of sorts (online, of course). I know a couple people who read this blog homeschool...so perhaps you can tell me if this is crazy or not. I just had the notion that if people could learn more about the complexities of homeschooling (rather than some of the stereotypes), it might help people realize that maybe homeschoolers can't always be pigeon-holed so easily. It also may help people to see that there are some people who don't fit into their preconceived notions.

And yeah, I know this entirely unscientific...and simply won't work for some people.

If you feel interested in being involved (as a homeschooler), all you need to do is answer some questions by responding to this post with a comment (with as much or little detail as possible). If you are interested in finding out about (other) homeschoolers, you can ask questions (politely, of course).

So, some questions I think are relevant:

Why do you homeschool?
What technique or curriculum do you use? Do your kids work above or below grade level (or both!)?
What is your educational level? Do you feel this has an effect on your teaching (both limits and abilities)?
What does your daily schedule look like?
Are your kids always polite and ready to learn? (*snicker*) Do the kids (or you!) get frustrated?
How has this affected your parenting?
How much free time do they have? What do they do during their free time? What hobbies do they have?
What difficulties and challenges do you have with homeschooling? What makes homeschooling enjoyable?
How do you get involved in the community? When do you have opportunities to interact with public or privately schooled children? Would you like more of these opportunties? How can they be created?
What is your least favorite homeschool stereotype? :-)
(If you do answer and have a blog, please leave a link. Or answer in your own blog and post the permalink here.)

'Kay...that's probably a good start. Please reply (hit the transmit link) if you feel so inclined.


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(Anonymous)
Jun. 13th, 2008 02:23 am (UTC)
Why do you homeschool? A verity of reasons. They change all the time LOL. One reason is because I have one child that learns quickly and the other child who is a more hands on learner and needs to be moving a lot. Neither are good for conventional schooling.

What technique or curriculum do you use? It's different every year and mostly it's a mix of a lot of different curriculum.

Do your kids work above or below grade level (or both!)? I have one that is above for a few subjects and right on for others and the other child is right on target.

What is your educational level? High School. Do you feel this has an effect on your teaching (both limits and abilities)? No, not really because what I don't know I find out by reading or asking someone who knows more and can explain to me or my boy's :)

What does your daily schedule look like? For my self only I have to be a little scheduled. Just so I know what comes next LOL. We get up early (they usually do on their own anyway) usually around 7a.m. eat breakfast, get dressed, teeth brushed and then start school around 8 a.m. Then I let the boy's decide what they want to do first, second and so on. Later we might do a project but not a lot of the time. Usually we are done around 11 AM or noon. Then we do whatever we want either at home or go some where or have field trips depending on what day it is and what we are doing :). This is only a loose schedule though so sometimes it's later or we do something totally different :D.

Are your kids always polite and ready to learn? (*snicker*) Do the kids (or you!) get frustrated? LOL this depends on the day too LOL. Most of the time they are pretty good but not always and sometimes I am cranky too LOL!!!

How has this affected your parenting? You know it's made us closer! When we first started homeschooling them I was doing it for them. Now we have all gotten closer. Sure there are "those day's" but I think it's had a positive effect for the most part!

How much free time do they have? A lot LOL. Depending on what we are doing that day.

What do they do during their free time? Play with each other or play on their own, play games, ride their bikes, play with friends, too much to list LOL.

What hobbies do they have? Right now they are 8 and 6 so riding their bike is their main hobby right now. All though they both like Star Wars and Indiana Jones things LOL. My older son likes to read and my younger son is just starting to read :)

What difficulties and challenges do you have with homeschooling? Mostly it's trying to find a good curriculum. Other struggles I guess would be trying to explain that no we don't stay home all day and the kids aren't locked in the basement forced to do school work LOL.

What makes homeschooling enjoyable? I love watching them learn something new for the first time and seeing it on their faces!! I also enjoy being around them and watching them learn things on their own even when I am not "teaching" them!

How do you get involved in the community? I actually joined a MOMS Club that isn't a homeschool group and they do service projects for the community. We all chip in together in these projects!

When do you have opportunities to interact with public or privately schooled children? All the time. Especially being in the MOMS Club I am in because most of those moms are moms who send their kids to either public, private or parochial schools. Then we have our neighbors the boy's play with all the time. I would have to say I think my boy's have more non-homeschool friends than homeschool friends (all though they do have some :) )

Would you like more of these opportunities? Doesn't matter to me since we are around all sorts of people all the time. My boy's pretty much get along with everyone :D.

How can they be created? Hmm I don't know. I just get out there and we meet people from all over :).

What is your least favorite homeschool stereotype? :-) LOL! The ever so popular question of "How do your children socialize?" Especially when you get it asked when your children are actively playing with the children of the person asking that question LOL.

http://homeschoolmoments.blogspot.com/
mareserinitatis
Jun. 22nd, 2008 03:49 am (UTC)
Especially when you get it asked when your children are actively playing with the children of the person asking that question LOL.

Very amusing. What do you say to those people?
(Anonymous)
Jun. 17th, 2008 08:15 pm (UTC)
Homeschool stereotypes
Why do you homeschool?
Actually, I just think its fun and I like that it is time efficient for the kids and frees up their day. I also like that a child can work at their level and that the activities can be more hands on than would be possible in a busy classroom.

What technique or curriculum do you use? Do your kids work above or below grade level (or both!)?
I use an eclectic approach--meaning one curriculum for math and a different one for science, etc. My oldest is years ahead in LA and slightly above in math. My youngest is just starting out.

What is your educational level? Do you feel this has an effect on your teaching (both limits and abilities)?
I have a college degree--no, not at the elementary level I wouldn't feel comfortable teaching 30 unknown kids of a wide range of abilities all day without some training, but I know my kids better than anyone.

What does your daily schedule look like?
We start about 9am and finish around lunch. The afternoon if free for group activities or play.

Are your kids always polite and ready to learn? (*snicker*) Do the kids (or you!) get frustrated?
Uh, no, not always... and yes sometimes

How has this affected your parenting?
We have frustrating moments occasionally but we also have a whole lot of positive interactions that help us get through the hard times. I try to always have some fun things to do during the day or mix up the routine enough to keep things from getting stale. As a homeschooling parent, I think I have learned to really use my creativity and think outside the box. We are not replicating public school in our home--homeschooling is really very different.

How much free time do they have? What do they do during their free time? What hobbies do they have?
We keep the TV off, so they are left with art projects, imaginative play and lots of time to read and also to explore the woods and creek we live near. There is also time for music, dance and art lessons.

What difficulties and challenges do you have with homeschooling?
As a parent, you do need to work harder at finding group and social outlets for your kids--you can't take that for granted like you might if they were in school. It is also hard to do something different from the mainstream, especially when you are a conformist at heart!

What makes homeschooling enjoyable?--The parents learn right alongside the kids! It is exciting and thrilling to see the kids' excitement for learning. It is challenging and fulfilling to find great hands on activities that really promote a love of learning.

How do you get involved in the community?
I lead a Brownie troup of neighborhood kids. I teach flute lessons to community kids. My kids are involved in local rec. sports, dance, music and drama. I teach Sunday School at our local church. I am in a community MOPS group and Bible study.

When do you have opportunities to interact with public or privately schooled children? Would you like more of these opportunties? How can they be created?
We interact all the time with public schooled kids. Our Brownie troup meets at the local school. Those kids are in the neighborhood and are friends with my kids. We have park days and playdates. They attend rec. sports and camps together.

What is your least favorite homeschool stereotype? :-)
That we are isolated weirdos. We are the 'quiet' homeschoolers-meaning we usually fly under the radar and nobody knows we homeschool. But as a result, I often hear people going on about homeschooling and 'poor homeschooled' kids, not knowing their children are currently playing with those 'poor' kids.
We also have several kids in our group who were pulled out of ps because of social problems. Some of them are ADHD or Asperger's and were teased and had difficulty in a school setting. Of course now that they are homeschooled, people instantly use them to reinforce the idea that all homeschooled kids are weird. One person I know pointed to a rather unusual hs girl as evidence that no one should homeschool which made me irate since the girl had been homeschooled all of 3 WEEKS!! I guess her last 5 years in ps didn't count...


(If you do answer and have a blog, please leave a link. Or answer in your own blog and post the permalink here.)
mareserinitatis
Jun. 22nd, 2008 03:50 am (UTC)
Re: Homeschool stereotypes
Thanks for responding!
(Anonymous)
Jun. 17th, 2008 09:33 pm (UTC)
why we homeschool
We homeschool mainly for academic reasons.
We use a wide variety of books and curriculums. Saxon for math and Story of the World are the only two we've used throughout.
I have a bachelors and my husband has two masters. I don't think higher education is necessary to homeschool. An intelligent, curious person who can recognize great resources is what really counts.
We tend to start school around 9am until 2pm. My kids work hard with long breaks btwn subjects. I'm very involved with their work, often going over readings with them. But as they are getting older, I'm leaving them more to themselves. Next year the oldest (13) will be mostly on his own.
My kids fight having to do school. Which is why we have a tight schedule where they know what they need to do in order to be finished for the day. But overall they're easy to work with and a pleasure to teach. My kids get compliments from other adults for being polite. But at home we're very casual with lots of joking and back talk. We're a very verbal, argumentative kind of family. I think homeschooling has made me a better parent because I've had to learn patience and understanding. I've driven my kids to tears and I've felt awful. But I've learned how to better handle situations and to really understand each of my children's personalities.
I have little free time during the day, but I get plenty after 2pm. My kids take piano and a martial arts. The boys are in scouts. Most of our friends and theirs are public schooled. But their best friends are homeschoolers also. We don't belong to any homeschool groups. I find the groups take up too much time during the week.
I guess I'm most annoyed by people who worry that homeschoolers lack oversight by the public education system. We're 2% of the school aged population. Go worry about the 90% of kids actually in the public schools.
mareserinitatis
Jun. 27th, 2008 01:58 am (UTC)
Re: why we homeschool
Thanks for your response!
(Anonymous)
Jun. 18th, 2008 02:43 pm (UTC)
Why do you homeschool? I want my kids to be excited about learning, not bored and trying to avoid it.
What technique or curriculum do you use? Do your kids work above or below grade level (or both!)? I guess I'm a bit of a holisitc unschooler. For grade level, probably both. Which is another great reason to homeschool.
What is your educational level? Do you feel this has an effect on your teaching (both limits and abilities)? Some college. Right now I don't think that's a problem. When my kids are older if there if I can't teach them something I can easily seek out someone else who can.
What does your daily schedule look like? What schedule? :)
Are your kids always polite and ready to learn? (*snicker*) Do the kids (or you!) get frustrated? Ha! Hahahahahaha!
How has this affected your parenting? I think I have to try harder to be more patient knowing I don't get an 8-9 hour break from them each day.
How much free time do they have? What do they do during their free time? What hobbies do they have? We have lots of free time, but that's usually when they are learning the most. Reading books, doing projects, asking a million questions until mommy can't take another "Why?" seems to be their hobbies of choice.
What difficulties and challenges do you have with homeschooling? Relaxing and not feeling like I have to push them somewhere that they aren't ready for yet.
What makes homeschooling enjoyable? Not getting up at the crack of dawn. :)
How do you get involved in the community? When do you have opportunities to interact with public or privately schooled children? Would you like more of these opportunties? How can they be created? It's summer right now, so just going to the park, the pool, the library, or anywhere else we normally go creates lots of opportunities. I think, for us, just going about our daily lives puts us out in the community often.
What is your least favorite homeschool stereotype? That we're all hate-filled, super-fundy, Christians who don't teach science. That one is like nails on a chalkboard to me.
(Anonymous)
Jun. 18th, 2008 02:43 pm (UTC)
Sorry, forgot to sign the comment.

Summer
http://momisteaching.com
(no subject) - mareserinitatis - Jun. 27th, 2008 01:59 am (UTC) - Expand
(Anonymous)
Jun. 19th, 2008 01:18 am (UTC)
My Answers
My answers can be found at
http://alasandras.blogspot.com/2008/06/you-are-invited-to-homeschool-mixer.html

This was a really neat idea.

~Alasandra
mareserinitatis
Jun. 22nd, 2008 03:51 am (UTC)
Re: My Answers
I'm glad you liked it. Thanks for your response and the link.
ext_105906
Jun. 20th, 2008 04:42 pm (UTC)
Survey

I didn't see any comments from non-homeschoolers. Perhaps some of you could answer an appropriate version of these questions to further the "mixing." Something like: "Why do you send your children to public school?" etc.

My answers:

Why do you homeschool?
We started because our son's needs were not being met. He was in K and already reading and, after endless testing and meeting, it was agreed he was bright. Duh! :) So he'd be allowed to walk up the hall and read with the 2nd graders. Too little, too late. We started hsing, loved it, continued. That was 10 years ago.

What technique or curriculum do you use? Do your kids work above or below grade level (or both!)?
We are unschoolers. No grade levels.

What is your educational level? Do you feel this has an effect on your teaching (both limits and abilities)?
My husband and I both attended a couple of years of college. I was a great student. He was a horrible student. None of that seems to have anything to do with what we do with our kids. We are older parents, so that may mean something when it comes to our ancient school experiences.

What does your daily schedule look like?
It's different every day. The kids figure out what they want to do and we try to do it. DS prefers a regular schedule for his Tae Kwon Do classes. DD has started taking some courses online but they don't have to be done at any particular time of day.

Are your kids always polite and ready to learn? (*snicker*) Do the kids (or you!) get frustrated?
Yes, we are just like actual humans and have different moods at different times.

How has this affected your parenting?
It has made it more enjoyable as I get to spend more time with my children.

How much free time do they have? What do they do during their free time? What hobbies do they have?
They have as much free time as they like. DS likes video games and DD is a big reader.


What difficulties and challenges do you have with homeschooling?
Can't think of any right now. Maybe my old car having too many miles put on it. :)


What makes homeschooling enjoyable?
Doing what we like with our days. Being as active or not as we like.


How do you get involved in the community? When do you have opportunities to interact with public or privately schooled children? Would you like more of these opportunties? How can they be created?
We are out and about doing what we want and interact like everyone else. We see other children, not really knowing how they are schooled, during our outings or in the process of participating in one activity or another.


What is your least favorite homeschool stereotype? :-)
That we are all religious. This is more and more not the truth and it has never been completely the truth. There are a growing number of secular hsers or at least we are more vocal.

Nance
mareserinitatis
Jun. 23rd, 2008 01:42 pm (UTC)
Re: Survey
Thanks for your response! I'll have to stir up the non-homeschoolers. :-)
(Anonymous)
Jun. 21st, 2008 01:58 am (UTC)
I blogged my response here (http://homeschooledtwins.blogspot.com/2008/06/homeschoolers-tell-all.html) over at Homeschooled Twins (http://homeschooledtwins.blogspot.com/)
mareserinitatis
Jun. 23rd, 2008 01:40 pm (UTC)
Thanks for the link.

I particularly liked this comment (statement of fact!): Homeschooled kids have time to play whereas institutionally schooled kids don't.

It makes you think about what the other kids are missing out on...
ext_106176
Jun. 21st, 2008 03:19 pm (UTC)
I participated
You can read my response at
http://rhicarian.wordpress.com/2008/06/21/264/
mareserinitatis
Jun. 23rd, 2008 01:35 pm (UTC)
Re: I participated
Thanks for posting your link.

Grades are for eggs.

Very true. :-D
ext_106336
Jun. 23rd, 2008 01:36 am (UTC)
Hello, pleased to meet you, I'm...
My homeschool mixer introduction is way too long to copy. I just posted it on my On Living By Learning blog, along with the link on Stargate learning.

It's a pleasure to meet a fellow Stargate lover!
mareserinitatis
Jun. 23rd, 2008 02:26 am (UTC)
Re: Hello, pleased to meet you, I'm...
Thanks for responding. I'm adding a permlink for anyone who want to find your specific article:

http://www.onlivingbylearning.com/2008/06/22/a-homeschool-mixer-introduction/
(Anonymous)
Jun. 23rd, 2008 05:13 am (UTC)
Stereotype? Who, Me?
Why I homeschool:
This is complicated and requires a long answer.

Factor 1;
My son would come home every day from school and complain that he was bored. The classes were too easy. He was in 4th grade and attending a private school at the time. After many meetings with his teacher we were finally told that, even though he never got anything lower than 98/100 on his lessons and tests, he wasn't one of their "top" students. WTF? Of course, we were never told what he had to do to become a top student.

Factor 2;
Our daughter was diagnosed with optic nerve hypoplasia. In other words; her optic nerves didn't develop completely and her vision is only correctable to 20/80. Without correction she is about 20/200. In every other respect she is normal and has no learning or physical disabilities. She just doesn't see well. She requires special large print books, magnifiers, and other aides in order to read or see the chalkboard. The private school she was in would not supply this equipment and it is not inexpensive. The public schools are legally required to do so but having worked in the public school system I know how well that usually works out. It doesn't. And I didn't want my daughter labeled as special needs.

Factor 3;
My husband is in the military and there was a good chance that we would have to move 1/2 way through the school year.

Factor 4;
There were a number of people in my neighborhood who homeschooled and I admired how intelligent and well behaved their children were. (stereotypical, I know, but true)

So, I started homeschooling.

Curriculum;
In my first year of homeschooling I tried a boxed curriculum. Some things worked, some didn't. The second year I used pieces of curriculum from different companies. This third year I am using various workbooks I can buy online or in the bookstore as well whatever catches my fancy and interests my daughter. I have always used daily life as a jumping off point for lessons. Google and other online search engines are my friends.

My daughter is currently above grade level in English, reading, comprehension and science. She is at or a little below grade level in Math. But, we have discovered why. When given a math problem on paper, the numbers and symbols all blurr together. When read the problem or when she is given a word problem, she has no difficulty at all.

I guess my style has really evolved into more of an "unschooling" outlook. There are core subjects, because the kids have to pass a yearly achievement if I'm to be allowed to continue homeschooling. But the rest is more of a "seat of the pants" approach.

My educational level:
I have BA in Biology, paralegal training and 9 months of graduate school work.
My husband has a BS in Biology, is a pediatrician that specializes in adolescents and has an MPH.
I think our education is both a positive and negative in homeschooling our children.
Positives; we enjoy learning. We read about all sorts of subjects and have a vast store of knowledge accumulated between the 2 of us. If our kids ask a question we can give them the straight answer or we know where to look to get the answer. Neither of us is afraid to say, "I don't know. Let's find out."
Negative; we have a tendency to focus on larger issues and not details. I, especially, have a tendency to forget that my kids don't have the background knowledge I do and end up giving them too much information which then causes confusion.
My Least Favorite Homeschooling Stereotype;

There isn't just one but, for the sake of brevity, I won't list them all. The big winner? That all homeschoolers belong to some strict form of religion; mainly some branch of Christianity.
I'm not a Christian. I don't follow any religion at all. I didn't choose homeschooling for religious reasons and it irks me mightily that many people assume I am Christian because I homeschool.

I hope I have helped add to your knowledge of the varieties of homeschoolers.
mareserinitatis
Jun. 23rd, 2008 01:33 pm (UTC)
Re: Stereotype? Who, Me?
Thanks for your response!
ext_106379
Jun. 23rd, 2008 10:10 am (UTC)
Survey
I blogged my answer here:

http://followthemuse.blogspot.com/2008/06/homeschool-survey-dispelling.html
mareserinitatis
Jun. 23rd, 2008 01:31 pm (UTC)
Re: Survey
Thanks for posting the link.

I really liked this paragraph:

I think it gives me a very healthy skepticism about what "should" be required. There is an amazing difference between what is taught at the graduate level in Education and what is actually practiced in most schools. Educational psychology has a lot of powerful things to say about how individuals learn. Unfortunately, schools can not implement most of it, because each class is a herd, and the teacher can't spend much time with each individual. I find it interesting that what educational psychologist would term "best learning practices" can be very effectively implemented by home schoolers because of our very low student-teacher/mentor ratio.

That's very reassuring!
(Anonymous)
Jun. 23rd, 2008 06:15 pm (UTC)
We unschool
We started homeschooling when the public gifted, then private school failed. Turns out my children were too advanced and the 'system' didn't care for kids ahead of the group. So I did lots of research and we ended up unschooling. We have no schedules. Education is pursued by interest. Curriculum is taken from multiple resources; internet, books, life on a farm, raising many, many pets, traveling for geography, museums, the list could go on for awhile but you get the idea.

Both my spouse and I have college degrees and diverse interests. Our children follow suit. My only regret is ever thinking that they needed to go to school to get an education. The time in school was one of the worst experiences of my children's life.

How did it work out? My oldest Aced her college entrance exams at 16 and is now doing well in college.
My youngest is following her lead.
mareserinitatis
Jun. 27th, 2008 01:59 am (UTC)
Re: We unschool
Thanks for your thoughts.
(Anonymous)
Jun. 23rd, 2008 07:12 pm (UTC)
Homeschooling survey...
I posted my comments on my blog...

http://ptmom.blogspot.com/


Thanks. This was a great idea. I love reading the responses.
mareserinitatis
Jun. 27th, 2008 01:57 am (UTC)
Re: Homeschooling survey...
Thanks for your response. (It is fun to read these!)
(Anonymous)
Jun. 23rd, 2008 08:45 pm (UTC)
Hi!
I posted my answers to your little questionnaire over at my homeschooling blog:
http://webmama-blog.blogspot.com/2008/06/why-homeschool.html (http://webmama-blog.blogspot.com/2008/06/why-homeschool.html)

~ Leah
mareserinitatis
Jun. 27th, 2008 01:56 am (UTC)
Thanks, Leah. :-)
mommakerry
Jun. 23rd, 2008 08:53 pm (UTC)
Homeschool Mixer
I began to HS after DS went to pre-k. My DS was very academically advanced, was not a "behavior problem", had no disorder of any type, and yet the teachers told me very candidly that if we put him in PS for kindergarten, he would likely be put on meds he didn't need to keep him quiet and still (over my dead body), or put in special ed that he didn't need, so I decided to HS him. I will continue HSing my family because I love it, it works and it gives them the chance to be themselves without being forced to hide their sometimes unconventional interests because of "peer pressure".

We use some formal curriculi, but we also do some "fly by the seat of my pants" teaching, and real life teaching as well.

My son is several grades above grade level in most subjects. My daughter is just starting out, but appears to be somewhat above grade level as well.

I am a college graduate, with a BA. I find that the subjects I am the most passionate about teaching (and therefore the best at teaching) are NOT my strong suits. I think it is due to the fact that I am also learning along with my kids, and finding it a whole lot more fun the second time around!

My schedule varies. Generally, I try to do work in the mornings, and save the afternoons for play.

My kids are NOT always ready and raring to go (they are human after all!) I try, within limits, to go with the mood. There are days where my DS wakes up and wants to work literally from 9am-9pm, and still ask for more, and I take advantage of those days. Then again, there are many MORE days where he just doesn't want to do any school at all, so I just give him the day "off", and let him play. I can't do that all the time of course, however I do notice that if I do this once in a while he does better work, and is more compliant about school the rest of the time.

We do get frustrated at times - yes, indeedy. However, I try to use even these moments as teaching tools (how to be persistent, learning meditation and other calming techniques, etc.), with varying degrees of success.

I think HS has enriched our family life and made us a much stronger and closer family unit.

I generally try to give them from approx. 2 pm until bedtime "off", contingent on them finishing their lessons. I think free time is in some ways as important as scheduled time. My DD does a lot of typical little girl play. My DS plays outside, rides his bike, draws a lot, reads and plays on the computer (I allow 1 hr of "retro" video game play/day, except in the summer when we "unplug". We have no videogame systems of any type.) His hobbies include anything having to do with road signs, pac-man and videogame history, and anything math-related.

It has been hard for us to find good friends. This is compounded by the fact that my son is a bit "different" as a result of being gifted.

I love spending time with my children, because I genuinely LIKE them. I also enjoy watching them get enthusiastic about a new subject, or about learning something new. Seeing that light bulb go on, so to speak, (and knowing I had something to do with it), is a real rush!

We get involved in our community through a HS co-op we belong to. Also, there are neighbor kids, but we haven't been lucky enough to have any close friendships develop from that. Mostly because these other kids are all too busy with homework.

We interact with "regularly schooled" kids at various lessons and classes, such as religious ed and chess club. I think that having extracurricular clubs through the school district be more open to accepting HSers would be a great opportunity to enrich both sides of the equation. My son belongs to a chess club that does that, and it is really nice to see all the kids from various situations interact. Also, it helps dispel some of the myths and stereotypes about HSers.

My least favorite HS stereotype is that we are all "social misfits". I have found it to be quite the opposite. My DS gets along with people of all types and ages. He is able to strike up a conversation with an adult, as well as a child, and is generally comfortable with anyone. His friendship options from that perspective are wide open, and not limited to those in his own grade.

mareserinitatis
Jun. 27th, 2008 01:55 am (UTC)
Re: Homeschool Mixer
Thanks!
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